The Highest Paid Paramilitary in Nigeria 2019: See Answer

Find out which paramilitary pays more in Nigeria in terms of salary yearly.

All paramilitary bodies in the country are under the consolidated paramilitary salary structure (CONPASS).

This means that there is a certain level of take home pay according to the hierarchy of ranks in all of the recognized defence agencies in the country.

Take for example, a civil defence officer salary should be equal to that of a FRSC cadet salary of same rank.

Unlike the military which the highest paid force is the Nigerian Airforce, this rule does not hold sway. This doesn’t mean that allowances and other bonuses aren’t paid to the officers.

In our previous posts, we have taken time to discuss the various monthly and yearly  remunerations of the following Nigerian paramilitary agencies below:

NSCDC Civil Defence Salary

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Immigration Ranks & Salary Structure

Federal Road Safety Corp (FRSC) Salary Scale

Nigerian Customs Salary Scale

Peace Corps of Nigeria Ranks and Salary.

Although there has been calls for the increment of salaries of the men and officers of these various security outfit, the Federal Government is yet to respond to that call.

Most people looking for jobs in any of these agencies should visit their websites for recruitment updates concerning vacancies as job openings in these paramilitary organizations is always a yearly exercise.

List of Recognised Paramilitary Organizations in Nigeria

1. Nigeria Immigration Service (NIS)

The Nigeria Immigration Service (NIS) was carved out from the Nigeria Police Force (NPF) in 1958. The functions of the NIS is to provide security that can address the operational challenges of modern migration.

Although, it is said that the Nigerian Immigration Service is the highest paid paramilitary outfit in the country since they deal with visa application and registration. They are also the body in charge of allowing immigrants entry into Nigeria.

If you are interested in working with the NIS click here to check out if there are vacancies for recruitment.

2. Nigeria Customs Service (NCS)

The NCS, was saddled with the responsibilities of revenue collection, accounting for same and anti smuggling activities.

It is the job of the Nigerian Customs to prevent smuggled and contraband goods from entering the country.

Most times, they work hand in hand with the police and other security outfits. The customs officers are also paid well since the have a unique position within the hub of the international supply chain of goods and services.

3. National Drug Law Enforcement Agency (NDLEA)

The National Drug Law Enforcement Agency (NDLEA) was established as one of the Paramilitary Organizations in the country by the promulgation of Decree Number 48 of 1989, now Act of Parliament.

The core function of this outfit was to investigate, prosecute and exterminate illicit drug trafficking and consumption in the Nigerian society.

Since the involvement in drugs by cartels, especially their importation, exportation, sale, transfer, purchase, cultivation, manufacture, extraction and possession is universally unacceptable by most countries of the world.

4. Federal Road Safety Commission (FRSC)

This organization was created by the federal government to embark of the following primary functions:

  • To make the highway safe for motorists and other road users.
  • Recommend works and devices designed to minimize accidents on the highways.
  • Advise the Federal and State Governments on how to reduce road traffic congestion.
  • Educate and sensitize road users and car owners on road signs and management.
  • Arrest offenders for violation of road use act.
  • Inspect and administer license and vehicle documents to road users.

Other paramilitary agencies worthy of mention is the Nigerian Prison Service (NPS). As of writing this post, the Peace Corps bill was rejected by the president, so it might be termed an illegal outfit soon.

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The Author

Chizoba

I am simply known as Ikenwa Chizoba, a seasoned blogger and the Founder of Nigerian Infopedia. A very simple person who loves writing, reading and research.

3 Comments

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  1. Joseph

    My comment is that the author should do his home work very well before publishing so that proper info will be made available to the public. How can the list of Paramilitary organisations be without Nigerian Prisons Service, only to be relegated to appendage? For your information, the NPS is the father of all the paramilitary organisations in Nigeria having been established in Nigeria in the year 1861 – the very year Nigeria was colonized by Britain. Then it was only the Army, the Police and the Prisons that were in existence. The Customs and Excise came later, Immigration came 1958 two years before independence.

    Moreover, do you know that it was the Nigerian Prisons Service that gave the Immigration Service their take -off training that established them? Do you also know that the NPS gave the FRSC initial training? Do you also know that it is the NPS that gave the Civil Defence their initial training both in general security operations and Weapon Training for their Armed Squad? It is unfortunate that Nigerians including those who are supposed to know relegate the Prisons Service in a deliberate and calculated ignorance, instead of boosting the morale of Prisons Officers for optimum performance. The stigma of prisoners seems to be transferred to them inspite of their immense and unequalled contributions to the National Security of Nigeria. Next time, you have to place Nigerian Prisons Service before others because seniority is a serious issue in a regimental organisations. ok? NPS is the father and progenitor of all paramilitary organisations in Nigeria. Find out and confirm this during independence parades at Eagle Square and at State Capitals as they match in order of seniority, the Military, Police, Nigerian Legion, Prisons etc. Do you understand? Thank you.

    1. Mide

      Thanks Joseph… Smiles

  2. Elijah

    Interested

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